ethics, insurance, and legal

What Could Go Wrong? Managing Expectations. Establishing Boundaries

Mrs. Franklin is 87 years old and has several old-age-related health challenges. Although her husband died many years ago, she has lived quite well on her own since then. Her son, Jimmy, lives 800 miles away. She has no other children.

Jimmy Franklin has hired you to be his mother’s advocate; to attend appointments with her, to arrange for her transportation to those appointments, and to provide feedback to him about his mother’s health, including her cognitive abilities. He reports that she’s been forgetful lately. He’s also worried something will happen and if she needs hospitalization, he wants to be sure you’ll be there to advocate for her, at least to stay with her until he can make travel arrangements.

The stage has been set….

What could go wrong? Plenty. Here is an example, and some must-do tasks to go along with it:

Read More –>

0

The Solution to the Paralysis of Analysis

Years ago, I wrote on the APHA Blog: Just Can’t Throw the Switch? The Analysis of Paralysis

Wow!  What a nerve I touched with the point — that sometimes we spend so much time worrying about what might happen if we attempt something big (like starting a new business) that we are too paralyzed to actually take the leap.

So let’s take a look at that leap…

Yes – it’s a biggie!  And while it’s not to be taken lightly, there are some truths that might help you take the leap.

First – let’s define it:

Read More –>

0

Document, Document, Document

From your first contact with a potential client, whether it’s by phone or in person, keep track of what you learn and what you’ve promised.

When you get started, you may think, “Why do I need to write down every detail? I can remember what I told him!” 

But what if the prospective client doesn’t call you back for several weeks? Or what happens the minute you have a second client with similar needs? Even if it’s just an inquiry – you’ll begin to mix up their stories, their needs, your promises – any part of the conversations with them. What you tell a prospective this week might be entirely different than what you’ll need to tell her in a few weeks. But to be consistent, and to sound professional, you need to have documentation to remind you of what you told her.

In fact, you’ll want to track much more than you can carry around in your head, no matter how well you remember things. The best practice is to record everything – from client details to family members, providers, medications, and new prescriptions, discussion summaries, to-do lists, decisions, ideas, wishes, advance directives (as appropriate), other documentation and its location – anything that might be helpful at another time.

Read More –>

1

Just Say NO

Especially in the early days of building a new advocacy or care management practice, you might be very tempted to attempt to fulfill any request that comes your way.

But smart business owners know when to say NO.

Sometimes it seems almost impossible to eek that small word out of our mouths!  But there will be as many times it’s important for NO to be your answer as they will be times you can agree. Maybe more.

So many advocates, because they have such HUGE hearts, want to please the person they respond to. But being a people pleaser at the wrong time won’t help you build a strong business.

When might NO be the right answer? 

Read More –>

0

Oops!

Nobody is perfect and you will make mistakes.  We all do!

You might forget to return a phone call, or you may invoice a client for too much or too little. You might run late, or even fail to appear at an appointment, or you might make a math mistake on a medical bill review … or thousands of other errors, large and small.

There are three “must dos” when you learn you’ve messed up in some way, as follows:

Read More –>

0
Page 1 of 2 12