marketing and client acquisition

How Do You Get to (the Advocate’s Version of) Carnegie Hall?

As the punchline goes….

Practice, practice, practice!

It should not surprise you when I tell you that convincing a potential client to sign a contract to work with you requires the same thing: practice, practice, practice.

I hear from so many new, wannabe advocates that they just can’t get a client to sign a contract, or they just hate asking for money and oh – yes! I do understand that!  Making those requests can be quite uncomfortable when doing so hasn’t been something you’ve ever had to do before. That’s for sure.

But there is a way you can get past that hurdle, become more comfortable with it, and move on to grow your successful advocacy or care management business.

Practice! OK, admittedly, easier said than done.

But, I’m here to make it easier for you with a 4-word piece of advice to do that.

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Overcoming Ba-a-a-ad Habits That Sabotage Your Success

If I want to be a hand model, then I should not bite my fingernails. Agreed?

If I stuff my face with cookies when I’m trying to lose weight, then I will probably not lose much. Right?

If I can’t sleep and I keep drinking coffee, then I may be preventing myself from falling asleep. Not a good idea!

Not unlike the effects of these bad habits, over the years, I’ve identified many B-A-A-D habits that stand stand squarely in the way of the ability to succeed at being an independent health or patient advocate or care manager.

No, they have nothing to do with biting your finger nails or stuffing yourself full of cookies – or even sheep! Instead they have everything to do with how you respond to inquiries from potential new clients in your efforts to guide them to do what you want them to do:  hire you and pay you.

Today we’re going to look at Ba-a-ad habit #1:

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Case Matters

Aha! I am guessing that you, as a health or patient advocate or care or even CASE manager, think this tip will address just that – case management – how you plan, handle, and track the work you do throughout a single patient’s case.

True?

Aha again! No! That’s not it.

Not that those things aren’t important – they most certainly are. In fact, all that planning, handling, and tracking is vitally important to the success of your work, and the improved outcomes of your client, and should be documented very carefully.

But that’s not today’s topic… today’s topic is just what the title says – it’s about case. In CASE you are confused…

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Great Promo: Getting a Heads UP! on Journalist Requests

One of the easiest ways to promote your expertise and/or your advocacy or care management practice is to watch for requests from journalists, then respond appropriately.

That sounds too easy, right?  “Oh sure. Like they are going to contact me and I’m going to answer them?”

Well – kind of.  At least it’s not much harder than that!

Journalists, writers, reporters, authors – anyone who works to provide content for media is on the constant lookout for experts in every subject imaginable, including health and medical care, the healthcare system, specific diseases or treatments, the horrors of medical care, the cost of healthcare, and other topics that PracticeUP! readers are knowledgeable about. Especially in a world of the 24/7 news cycle, all media wants to respond to the news immediately, or go in-depth on subjects that will garner their followers’ interest.

So the question isn’t about whether there is opportunity to be quoted or featured. The question is only – how can you make sure they know to talk to you? 

The simple answer is that you want to be notified, or want access to requests that address your specific expertise. You want a heads up when you are the right person to talk to the journalist.

I know of two different ways you can do that – both very simple:

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The Third Question to Ask a Prospective Client

A few months ago we looked at the FIRST question to ask a prospective client.  That first question is actually a self-defense move; making sure you aren’t getting yourself into a problem with someone who has been advocate-hopping and avoiding payment.

Find that First Question to Ask a Prospective Client

The second question to ask them is their first name. Yes. Just their first name at first, so they won’t think you are trying to delve into their personal business, or their situation too far, before they are ready. Should the call progress and you know they’ll be comfortable sharing their last name, too, then it will be time to ask more.

And then – Question #3 – this is a question to help you too!  Asking this question, and getting an accurate-as-possible answer can help you save time, money, and frustration.

What’s that question?

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